Posts Tagged ‘journalism’

Some of you may recall that back in 2015, I started writing a short story that was about a human Barbie doll. This story was inspired by a news article I read about a young woman in Russia who looked exactly like a human Barbie, all without any surgeries (as far as we’re aware), and with the help of her parents as well. The story boggled my mind, and I wondered what would cause anyone, let alone their parents, to want to try to pursue that aesthetic to such a degree. After all, studies have shown that if Barbie were real, she’d have a pretty miserable life because of how strange her body is.

Thus started my work on “A Project in Western Ideals,” (alternatively called “My Perfect Body” at one point), about a teenage girl who is molded by her guardian figure into becoming a human Barbie doll.

Problem is, I was never satisfied with the story I was producing. No matter how many drafts I churned out, I always ended up rewriting it or going back or stopping in the middle of writing to wonder why this story wasn’t clicking. This cycle continued on and off for three whole years, mainly off because I was working on other projects.

And then, a couple of months ago, I had an idea on how to fix the story. And then I began to work on it again and more ideas came to me. And finally, this story came into focus. It clicked with me, became better than average.

And tonight, I finished the damn thing. I finished a draft of “A Project in Western Ideals” I feel proud of, that I could show an editor and say, “It’s not completely ready for publication yet, but it’s a start, and I think it’s a good one too.” And at 49 pages and 14,062 words, it’s a decent-sized novelette too. That’s a bit long for some publications, but I think I might still be able to find a home for it. As this past year has shown, a lot of hard work and persistence can lead to amazing things.

But for now though, I’ll leave this story alone for a while. I’ll come back to edit it when I’m able to look at it with a fresh pair of eyes. In the meantime, I’ll work on a few other stories, and see what else I can produce.

That’s all for now, my Followers of Fear. Thanks for reading my late-night progress report. I’ll probably have at least one or two more blog posts out this week, so keep an eye out for them. Until then, time for bed. Goodnight, and pleasant nightmares to you all.

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I just published my latest post on Self-Published Authors Helping Other Authors. And I’m sure I’m going to be stepping on a few toes by posting this one: Writing a Sex Scene. Yeah, I went and wrote this article. I can already feel gray hairs sprouting on the heads of people I know who either still think of me as a funny, if somewhat wild child, or who just didn’t think I could find a way to give them cause to worry.

But I felt it was necessary to write this post. As much as we try to ignore or laugh (or even disparage) at any mention of sex in our media, it’s become quite common to depict sex in our work. And that includes our literature. Surprisingly though, not a lot of time is devoted to actually showing people how to write those scenes. Not as much as could be, anyway. I’ve written a couple of scenes involving sex, so I thought it would be good to write an article with some tips on how to write those scenes. And surprisingly, this article is cleaner than you would expect.

If you’re at all curious, please take a moment to check out the article. And while you’re there, check out the other articles on the site. Self-Published Authors Helping Other Authors is a great site devoted to helping authors of all genres, backgrounds and experiences to write, edit, publish and market their work effectively and without spending a fortune on it either. I’m not just a contributor, I’m also someone who has been helped immensely by the site, so definitely check it out if you have the chance.

That’s all for now, my Followers of Fear. I’ve got plenty to do today, so I’ll check in another time. Until then, pleasant nightmares!

Good morning, everyone! Crazy to think I’m on Day Seven of this thing. And trying to think of a book for each and every day is a challenge in and of itself. Well, hopefully after this post, I’ll be able to do the next three days without too much work. Fingers crossed, anyway.

Anyway, welcome back to the Ten Day Book Challenge, caused by my cousin Matthew nominating me and by me just turning it into a blog challenge rather than a Facebook challenge. Here are the rules:

  • Thank whoever nominated you with big, bold print. If they have a blog, link to the post where you got tagged there.
  • Explain the rules.
  • Post the cover of a book that was influential on you or that you love dearly.
  • Explain why (because I don’t see the point of just posting a picture of a book cover without an explanation. That goes for Facebook as well as blogs).
  • Tag someone else to do the challenge, and let them know they’ve been tagged.

Today’s book will be surprising for those of you who’ve been following this thing from the beginning. It’s not horror, and it’s not a book that I read during my childhood. Instead, it’s one I read during my late teens and that I still think of as a beautiful story every time I think of it: The Alchemist by Paulo Coelho.

This novel is just a beautiful story, following a young shepherd who has a dream that he’ll find great treasure near the pyramids of Egypt. When he has this dream three nights in a row, he takes it as a sign and starts a journey from Spain and along the length of North Africa to Egypt. Along the way, he encounters many amazing characters and learns much about himself and about the world, as well as the power of action and fulfilling your destiny.

Both literature and inspirational self-help novel, The Alchemist is all about following your personal destiny and overcoming obstacles that arise to keep you from doing that. I feel that a lot of people are too afraid to seek their own destiny or just pray that God or some other higher power will grant them their destiny without doing the work to make it happen. Coelho’s novel is all about taking your destiny by the reins and seeking it out yourself, rather than doing nothing or letting obstacles keep you from doing so.

Sounds whimsical and optimistic when I discuss it here, but when you hear about the author’s own life, you realize it’s not so: Coehlo was institutionalized by his parents as a teen because he wanted to be a writer and take a non-traditional path, and later in life was arrested by Brazil’s military government for ‘subversive activities.” Despite all that and more, he explored himself, became a successful songwriter, and then a successful writer. So in a way, the story in The Alchemist mirrors his own struggles to find his path in life. It’s not just some optimistic fantasy about fulfilling your dreams.

And if you haven’t read it yet, I highly recommend you do.

Today I’m tagging my friend Caitlin Kelly of Broadside Blog. She’s a journalist with years of experience and has read many great books in her life, so I’m hoping she tries this out. We’ll see.

That’s all for now, Followers of Fear. It’s Friday, so I’m looking forward to a good weekend here in DC. Hope whatever’s going on in your life, you have a good weekend as well. Until next time, pleasant nightmares!

My latest article on Self-Published Authors Helping Other Authors, “What Do You Wear to an Author Event?” has just gone live on the site. As these self-evident titles of mine show, this one is about what authors should wear to a reading, book signing, or if you somehow end up on national television (which hopefully doesn’t involve urine released during a nervous mood). It’s a question I’ve had to wrestle with recently with Rose’s eventual publication on the horizon. Someone suggested to me I might want to consider dressing up a bit more now that I was at a new stage of my career, and of course I wondered if that was necessary.

The answer will shock you.

Please go and check out the article if you have a moment. And if you have the time, check out the rest of the site. Self-Published Authors Helping Other Authors is an excellent site with helpful and introspective articles from self-published and hybrid authors on how to write, edit, publish and market efficiently and effectively. No matter your genre, experience and background, you’ll find an article with information that you’ll find truly helpful. Believe me, I should know. I’m not just a contributor, I’m a reader.

That’s all for now, my Followers of Fear. I’ve got stories to work on, so I’m going to get on those. Until next time, pleasant nightmares!

I’ve got another article from Self-Published Authors Helping Other Authors for your perusal. This one is “The Elevator Pitch: Telling People About Your Book in One Sentence.” And that’s really what it’s all about: how to get people interested in reading your books with a single sentence. I learned how to use elevator pitches when I was searching for a job, and it’s actually pretty handy in a number of other situations, including book promotion. You’d be surprised how many people have shown an interest in Rose after hearing my elevator pitch for the book.

If you have a chance to check out the article, please do and let me know what you think. And if you like what you read, make sure to read the other articles on the site. Self-Published Authors Helping Other Authors is a great resource for authors looking to write, edit, publish, and market their stories efficiently and economically. I should know, I’m not just a contributor, I’m also a reader.

That’s all for now, my Followers of Fear. And I hope it’s the last post for a while. I’ve got a lot of editing to do, so I’m going to get on that. And as much as I love you guys, I really need to focus on that. Don’t worry though; I’m planning on having a new review out on Saturday at the latest.

Until next time, pleasant nightmares.

My latest article from Self-Published Authors Helping Other Authors, Lengthening Your Story, has just gone live. Have you ever written a story and then were told it had to be longer? I had to do it with Rose, and this is partly how I did it. I’m passing on these strategies in the hope everyone who reads the article finds them helpful. Go and check it out if you have a chance and the inclination.

And while you’re there, why not check out the other articles there? Self-Published Authors Helping Other Authors is a great site with hundreds of articles for authors by authors to help them write, edit, publish and market effectively. You never know. One of those articles might help you write and market the next big thing.

That’s all for now, my Followers of Fear. I’ll hopefully have a new post soon, but I’ve got a lot of editing to do in the coming weeks, so I’ll be occupied a lot of the time with that. So until next time, pleasant nightmares!

My latest article from Self-Published Authors Helping Other Authors, How to Write an Interlude, has just gone live on the site. I don’t see a lot of discussion on this topic, so I thought I’d write an article on the subject (it beat writing another article about Lani CSarem and her con job, anyway). Click on the link, and learn all about writing interlude chapters in your novels.

And while you’re at it, why not check out the rest of the site? Self-Published Authors Helping Other Authors is a wonderful site that is written by authors for authors to help them write, edit, publish, and market, no matter their background, budget, or story. It’s great, it’s free, and it’s quite edifying. Believe me, I’m not just a contributor, I’m a client (so to speak).

That’s all for now, my Followers of Fear. I hope you enjoy the article, and I hope to have another post on this blog out very soon. Until next time, pleasant nightmares.