Posts Tagged ‘charity’

So in case you missed it, yesterday MGM released the first trailer for their new Addams Family movie, which is due out in October. If you haven’t seen it yet, I’ve embedded it below.

How awesome is that? The animation looks stunning, the voices match the characters, and the format of animation is perfect for a family that is never explicitly stated to be but probably is supernatural and evil in nature. You can tell a lot of love went into the making of this film.

I’ve been a fan of the Addams Family for years. Back in 2012, I wrote a post about how much I’d love to be an Addams, back when this film was still in development as a stop-motion picture with Tim Burton attached. I’ve watched my favorite episodes of the original TV series multiple times over the years, I just watched both movies from the 1990’s last month, and I saw a local production of the Addams Family Musical not too long ago. So you can imagine how much I am for this movie.

And all this Addams stuff has got me thinking. And the more I think about it, the more I realize: we could all benefit from taking a few pages out of the Addams’s books.

Not like their actual books, because those are likely cursed, and not like we should all be more drawn to the dark and occult. Though if more people were drawn to the darker and eerie subjects and tastes like the Addams or myself, I would not complain. Also, it seems to do them very well. Despite their unconventional lifestyles, the Addams are among the richest clans in the world. I wouldn’t be surprised if one led straight to the other (likely without anyone’s souls getting sold to a demon, though that is a possibility I won’t dismiss out of hand).

No, what I mean is that the Addams embody many qualities that we as a society could learn from.

These are people we could stand to learn something from.

For starters, the Addams are very kind and accepting of others. Yeah, they do get disgusted at the idea of anyone having daisies in their yards, but they’ll just accept anyone who does have daisies in their yards as long as they’re polite. In fact, in one episode of the 1960’s TV series, Morticia responded to this idea by stating that “we’ll just have to accept that some people have a warped sense of beauty.” They care less about what you like or what your background is and more about what your character is. Are you a nice person? Can you get along with others? Can you act like a civil person in front of someone you disagree with? That’s what the Addams value (though if you share their interests in the macabre, even better).

The Addams are also extremely generous. With the exception of the musical, in every incarnation of the characters their generosity is always emphasized. Money is nice and allows them to do what they want, but Gomez and Morticia are more than willing to part with their money or their heirlooms if someone needs them more than they do or if someone compliments the stuff on the walls.*

In this day and age, that’s kind of revolutionary. People have an us vs. them mentality, to the point where people commit acts of violence and cruelty because “they’re different from me.” And this may just be me, but at times I feel like it’s looked down upon to willingly part with your money, even to help someone else out.

With the Addams Family, there’s none of that. They could care less about us vs. them as long as you’re a nice person, and they would gladly take part in any charity auction you talked to them about. And in a world that seems more and more hateful and greedy, that’s something extraordinary. At least in my humble opinion.

Plus, there’s the fact that Gomez and Morticia are everyone’s relationship goals, the whole family is involved in making sure the next generation turns out “alright,” they’re big on family, they keep up with current events, business and science, and the family on a whole is extremely cultured. They love theater, dance and art, learning about global cultures, and studying history. In the first episode of the 1960’s TV series, Wednesday and Pugsley demonstrate familiarity with the French Revolution and its more morbid details. Those kids are six and eight respectively in that series, and they know that much already! I’m nearly twenty-six and studied the French Revolution in college. I’m still fuzzy on certain details. How cool is it that those kids know that much?

Given my interest in the macabre (like Lizzie Borden’s grave, for instance), I think I’d make a great Addams. Don’t you?

In any case, I’m looking forward to seeing this movie, and a new generation being introduced to the wonderfully unique Addams. Hell, maybe people will learn something from them.

But tell me, what are your thoughts on the Addams and their new movie? Did I miss anything that makes them figures to emulate? And when will we get a trailer for IT: Chapter Two (I mean, it is less than four months away)? Let’s discuss.

 

And while I still have your attention, I’m still looking for advanced readers for my upcoming novel Rose. This fantasy-horror novel follows a young woman who starts turning into a plant creature (and that’s just the start of her problems). In exchange for an early electronic copy of the book, all I ask is that you read it and then consider writing a review of it on or after the release date. If you’re interested, please send me an email at ramiungar@ramiungarthewriter.com and I’ll get you on the list.

*That’s actually the biggest flaw in the plans of the villains from both the 1991 and the 1993 movies. The villains didn’t have to resort to subterfuge to get to the Addams fortune. They could’ve just shown up at the front gate, said they were on hard times (true for their former lawyer and possibly the villain of the second film) and asked if the Addams could help them out somehow. They’d probably welcome you in and let you sleep in a spare bedroom, with no obligation for rent or a move-out date. If you behaved yourself and became close to the family, they’d probably adopt you and rename you Cousin Porch, because that’s where they first met you.

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I’ve been meaning to write about this all week, but…well, you know how it is! Busy life! Especially right before finals. Well, I have a moment before a final this evening, so I’ll take advantage of it right now.

As you know, I’ve been raising money for Buckeyethon again this year. Buckeyethon is an annual charity drive that raises money for research into juvenile cancer. I’ve raised money for it the past two years, and I’m raising money again this year. I was a little worried that I’d have trouble reaching this year’s minimum goal because it’s a bit higher (the university is trying to hit one million dollars this year), but I’m happy to say that a lot of people pulled through and helped me not only reach, but surpass the minimum goal! That’s right. As of this writing, I’m at $298, which is more than the previous years combined. Can I just say one thing? Cowabunga!

Also, I’d like to name and thank the many people who donated. You not only helped me, you helped the many children and adults out there who are suffering from their own cells gone awry. By donating, you are funding treatments that will go a long way to stopping cancer and allowing these people to live full and wonderful lives. These are my great benefactors:

  • Sarah Strasser
  • Chad Foust
  • Vicki Miller
  • Angela Misri
  • Michael Ungar
  • Wendy Mohr and Wendy Ungar
  • Anna Wilkinson
  • Michele Ungar
  • Diane Stemper

All of you, thank you so much for your patronage.

Of course, just because I’ve surpassed my goal doesn’t mean I’m anywhere near done. I’m still collecting through late January/early February, so you have till then to donate by clicking on this link. Every donation, no matter how small, helps to combat the threat of cancer, so every donation is greatly appreciated.

That’s all for now. Once again, thanks to all my donors for your help. It means a whole lot to me.

For the kids, is the motto.

Some of you may remember back in February I participated in something called Buckeyethon. It’s a charity event here at my lovely Ohio State University that’s done every winter that raises money for juvenile cancer research. It ends with a dance marathon lasting twelve hours and where the guests of honor are kids we are helping.

I had a wonderful time last year, raising money for the event, dancing and seeing friends, and meeting the kids I was actually helping out. And at the very end of it, everyone who raised money–over two-thousand students–learned we’d raised over six-hundred and eight thousand dollars for charity. And I want to do it again. Only this time, I’m going to raise a hell of a lot more than I did last year.

Now I know that self-published authors asking their readers for money is considered really tacky. I avoid doing anything like that. I don’t even tell people to buy my books! I encourage it, but I don’t say “buy it or something bad will happen, even something just as minor as I not being able to write anything in the future.”

But this isn’t for me. It’s for charity purposes. it’s for helping children. It’s for curing diseases that takes kids and puts them through hell they shouldn’t have to go through. So that’s why, although I have serious misgivings about going on my blog and asking for people to help me meet my goal and beyond, I’m going to ask. I just hope that afterwards, nobody who reads this blog regularly will be put off and decide not to follow me anymore because I asked for help in this.

Okay. Here I go.

Will you please help me raise money to cure juvenile cancers? If you want to donate, please follow this link to donate. If you don’t want to donate, that’s your choice and I totally respect that. And if you don’t want to read this blog anymore because I asked for money on a blog, I disagree with you but it’s your choice.

Thanks for your help, and I really appreciate it. All donations are accepted up till (as far as I can tell, because I haven’t received a deadline date yet, and I’m sure donations will be accepted up until the last minute) February 14th. Yep, February 14th. Valentine’s Day.  What a way to show kids that you love them no matter what.

So thanks for the help. I really appreciate it. And I hope you continue to read this blog, no matter what.